Tag: shrill

July 2017 @BookOfTheMonth Delivery: Reviews Of Dark Matter, Shrill and Final Girls

Book Of The Month July 2017 Reviews On Novels And Nonfiction

Book Of The Month is a subscription service that sends you one hardcover book per month out of five selections for a low monthly subscription fee. You can add 2 more titles to your monthly delivery for $9.99 each, and the price overall is very cheap for full-size hardcovers.

Book Of The Month is not paying me to promote their service. I just love it so much that I’ve turned my monthly deliveries into a feature on my blog 🙂 I do encourage you to try it though, because if you like hardcovers it’s a great deal.

You can use my referral link to sign up if you’re interested in trying it. You’ll get your first three months for just $9.99 each plus a cute tote. And I’ll get a free book when you join. Win, win!

My July selections for Book Of The Month were all pretty different from each other. Two were technically thrillers, but diametrically opposite in terms of what the genre can encompass. Dark Matter ended up being by far my favorite out of the three titles, and it’s definitely in my Top 5 Book Of The Month reads to date (idea for a new post once I’ve caught up with my BOTM reviews?). Shrill was funny and thought-provoking but felt like an anthology of articles more than anything, and I struggled with whether to give Final Girls 2 or 3 stars (before settling on 3). Read my reviews to find out why.

Feminism 101 Reading List – 16 Books To Educate Myself About Feminism

Feminism 101 Reading List On Novels And Nonfiction

On Saturday, I, like millions of other people in the U.S. and around the world, participated in the Women’s March (in LA) to stand up for women’s rights and against discrimination on the basis of race, gender identity or sexual preference. It was an incredibly inspiring morning, seeing so many people – men, women, children – come together to stand up for our shared values. Like others at marches around the globe, I was also protesting the new U.S. Presidential administration’s intentions to negatively impact women and minority groups through bigoted and backwards-looking policies (some of which we’re unfortunately already seeing enacted).

After the march, I read a lot of the coverage of this historic event, including different looks at how modern day feminism, in all its varied manifestations, fits more broadly into the history of feminism as a whole. I realized that though I firmly identify as a feminist, and I can articulate the reasons for which it’s still important to protect women’s rights, there’s a lot I don’t know about the history of feminism, its intersection with race, and the different forms it can take.

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