Tag: science

10 February 2018 Book Releases I’m Excited About

February 2018 Book Releases On Novels And Nonfiction

Every month, I pick 5 nonfiction and 5 fiction books being released that month that sound like good reads to me, based on my personal preference in topics and genres, as well as advance reviews on Goodreads and Amazon.

Some themes in the titles I picked for this month include feminism, crime, historical fiction and identity. It’s always interesting how book releases that are popular in any given month sometimes seem to clump together easily by topic, in response to what is going on in society and what readers are therefore most interested in.

Two of the books are Book Of The Month picks for this month (they really hit it out of the park with their selections for February 2018), and many are also currently available on Net Galley, so there should be lots of options for your TBR list!

10 November 2017 Book Releases I’m Looking Forward To

Ten November 2017 Book Release I'm Looking Forward To On Novels And Nonfiction

Every month, I pick 5 nonfiction and 5 fiction books being released that month that sound like good reads to me, based on my personal preference in topics and genres, as well as advance reviews on Goodreads and Amazon.

In this month’s list, I’m definitely most excited about Prairie Fires on the nonfiction side and Artemis on the fiction side. I’ve already requested both on Net Galley and have reviews scheduled for later in the month. Other picks from this list that are still available for request on Net Galley (for the bloggers out there) are Little Broken Things and The Story Of Arthur Truluv.

Hopefully you find something here that catches your eye!

Just Read: Cannibalism – A Perfectly Natural History by Bill Schutt @draculae

Cannibalism Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

I know what you’re thinking. What’s up with this girl that she chose to read a book all about Cannibalism?  Or maybe if you’re a science geek like me, you’re just as fascinated by the topic. Believe it or not, whether you’re so grossed out about cannibalism that you would never choose to read about it or not, cannibalism is a natural part of the animal world. We, as humans, are kind of aberrations for having mostly abandoned it (though I’m pretty thankful that no one is planning to eat me).

When I included Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History in my February 2017 Releases list, I RAN to Net Galley to make sure I could score a copy, and I devoured the whole thing (no pun intended) in a couple of days. It’s everything that I love in books about a specific scientific topic – filled with disparate and enthralling examples, wide-ranging in its scope and yet super easy to follow, and most importantly, concisely written. If you love learning about science and about weird aspects of the life that surrounds you like me, pick this one up.

Just Read: Hidden Figures & The Glass Universe – Pioneer Female Scientists In Astrophysics

Hidden Figures And The Glass Universe On Novels And Nonfiction

I’m an avid reader of anything having to do either with the history of scientific progress or with astronomy/astrophysics, so any book combining both is a perfect fit for my reading palate. When in addition you add in the element of pioneering women, making strides in a field previously forbidden to them due to gender or racial discrimination, I’m so on board, it’s not even funny.

I first heard about Hidden Figures because I work in the entertainment industry and I found out that the movie version that came out in December was based on a true story. I haven’t watched the movie yet, so the review below is only for the book, though now that I’ve read about the spunk of Katherine Johnson (the character portrayed by Taraji P. Henson), I’m sure Taraji’s performance is going to be a slam dunk.

Soon after deciding that I wanted to read Hidden Figures in advance of watching the movie, I learned that Dava Sobel (who wrote the excellent albeit nerdy Longitude) was coming out with a new book on a different group of female pioneers in science. Several characters in The Glass Universe have a connection to my alma mater, Wellesley College, and the rest is history. Here are my reviews of both titles. If you have any recommendations of more similar books about female contributions to scientific progress, please send them my way!

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