Tag: nonfiction november 2017

#NonfictionNovember 2017 Week 5: Ten Nonfiction Titles Just Added To My TBR

Nonfiction Titles New To My TBR On Novels And Nonfiction

It’s the final week of Nonfiction November and the final topic was Nonfiction Reads New To My TBR and was hosted by Emerald City Book Review. I went back and looked through everyone’s Nonfiction November posts as well as comments on my own posts to sift through all the amazing recommendations I read and received throughout the month.

The titles I picked for this list mostly fall within topics for which I either want to create or update book lists next year (Russia, World War II, China and Fateful Voyages) and that I therefore hope to read soon. A few were books I’d heard of and considered reading in the past, but seeing them featured on a blog this month reminded me of them again – for example My Life In Middlemarch.

Thanks to everyone for all the TBR fodder this month and thanks to Sarah’s Book Shelves, Doing Dewey, Emerald City Book Review, Julz Reads and Sophisticated Dorkiness for doing such a great job of hosting – can’t wait for next year!

#NonfictionNovember 2017 Week 4: My Top 10 Favorite Nonfiction Reads

My Top Ten Favorite Nonfiction Reads On Novels And Nonfiction

The topic for Week 4 of Nonfiction November is Nonfiction Favorites, and the hosting blog is Doing Dewey. Instead of answering the provided questions, I decided to put together a list of my Top Ten Favorite Nonfiction Books to date.

The ten titles I selected easily fit into four overarching categories or types of nonfiction: Sweeping Histories, Atypical Memoirs, Memorable Royal Women and Medical Investigations. I reflected further on why I was drawn to each category and title below. In doing so, I realized that the elements I always look for in nonfiction are:

  1. Either a book that effectively summarizes a really long span of time, or one that focuses on a really weird and unique experience
  2. Highly personal writing in either case that always ties back the narrative to individual experience
  3. Conciseness in the writing – no droning on aimlessly
  4. To feel that I am learning something new.

Today is also the first official day of the #ThanksgivingReadathon ! If you haven’t published a Sign-Up post yet or posted your reading intentions on social media, make sure to do so today!

Nonfiction November 2017 Week 3: World War II Book List #NonfictionNovember

10 Incredible World War II Nonfiction Reads On Novels And Nonfiction

It’s Week 3 of Nonfiction November, and so far it’s been so much fun to see everyone’s themed posts. My love of nonfiction is being reconfirmed by all the time I’m spending reading about it, thinking about it and reviewing it this month!

For Week 3, the topic was Be The Expert/Ask The Expert/Become The Expert and was hosted by Sophisticated Dorkiness. I’d been reading towards a World War II nonfiction book list for a while, so I thought this was the perfect opportunity to be the expert and post it!

World War II is definitely one of the most popular historical time periods for both fiction and nonfiction. There are so many different aspects of the war that can be explored in either genre, and I tried to focus on nonfiction titles that spanned a range of topics, countries and historical figures. Hope you find plenty of inspiration for your TBR lists below!

#NonfictionNovember 2017 Week 2: Nonfiction To Fiction Book Pairings

Nonfiction To Fiction Book Pairings On Novels And Nonfiction For Nonfiction November 2017

The Week 2 topic for Nonfiction November this year was Nonfiction To Fiction Book Pairings. It’s a review structure that I’ve been dabbling in recently, so I thought I would combine a new set of nonfiction to fiction reviews with links to two earlier ones I posted on the blog in the last few months.

The new reviews for today’s post are for memoir Born A Crime by Trevor Noah and novel Hum If You Don’t Know The Words by Bianca Marais. Both books are set during Apartheid in South Africa, but ultimately only have a few things in common. The most interesting and significant parallel I found between Noah’s true story and that of Marais’ young female white character Robin, are in the spunk and initiative that both show amid extremely trying circumstances. Somehow, Robin’s character felt like it almost had the same level of dogged perseverance as Noah, though they experienced Apartheid with different skin colors and in different decades.

Hope you enjoy my reviews and don’t forget to also check out my two earlier book pairings below.

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