Tag: mystery

March 2018 @BookOfTheMonth Reviews: An American Marriage, Not That I Could Tell and The Wife Between Us

Book Of The Month March 2018 Book Reviews On Novels And Nonfiction

My March Book Of The Month selections ended up being pretty solid choices for me. The weightier one among the three is literary fiction novel An American Marriage, while the other two are lighter reads that would fit well for a more escapist mood. Not That I Could Tell was a mystery that – despite a few less intriguing characters – held my interest well from start to finish. While The Wife Between Us is a thriller that fell a bit flat shortly after the big midway twist.

Read my full reviews of all three below and let me know in the comments what you thought if you’ve read them as well!

February 2018 @BookOfTheMonth Reviews: The Ocean At The End Of The Lane, The Broken Girls and The Great Alone @neilhimself @simone_stjames

Book Of The Month February 2018 Reviews On Novels And Nonfiction

I’m still working on getting caught up with my old Book Of The Month reviews and I’ve already read through all the March 2018 books I ordered, so I should have reviews for those up early next week. I may alternate newer with older months going forward as I get caught up, so I can read their more recent picks and review them closer to the actual release date.

Out of the three books I selected for February 2018, I was expecting to like The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah the best. It actually ended up being the one I rated lowest out of three. I really liked it at the outset – historical fiction, Alaska, a young bold protagonist, what’s not to like – but it kind of fell apart for me at the end. Keep reading to find out why, and also why I gave my other two February 2018 picks a higher rating.

December 2017 @BookOfTheMonth Reviews: The Poisonwood Bible, The English Wife And The Chalk Man

Book Of The Month December 2017 Reviews On Novels And Nonfiction

December 2017 was definitely among my most successful months to date in terms of my Book Of The Month picks. I gave each of the titles I selected 4 stars or more, including a 5 star rating to modern classic The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.

Each of the titles fulfilled its promise and also the purpose for which I selected them, from the more literary tones of The Poisonwood Bible, to the lighter historical mystery of The English Wife, to the scary but not too scary thriller vibes of The Chalk Man.

I would recommend each of these books for different reasons, but I think that at least The English Wife and The Chalk Man would likely appeal to most readers, as they are broad and universal iterations of their respective genres. Read my full reviews below!

Book Pairing: What Made Maddy Run By Kate Fagan And Reconstructing Amelia By Kimberly McCreight

What Made Maddy Run And Reconstructing Amelia Book Pairing On Novels And Nonfiction

I first included What Made Maddy Run by Kate Fagan in my list of Nonfiction Book releases I was looking forward to in Summer 2017. I knew it would be an important read, although there’s something to be said about the fact that a book about suicide that did not involve a beautiful, young, white woman would not have gotten the same level of attention. I actually felt that Maddy’s story was important exactly because she fit so neatly into that image of an ‘ideal’ or privileged life and was still subject to intense pressure, depression, and ultimately the impulse of taking her own life.

This was the kind of book pairing in which one book directly leads you to another. What I mean is that I didn’t read What Made Maddy Run and then decide to find a novel that covered suicide to match it with. Rather, Reconstructing Amelia is mentioned in Kate Fagan’s book about Maddy because Maddy decided to leave a copy of the novel at the top of the parking structure from which she committed suicide. Once I learned that, I felt that reading Reconstructing Amelia might help me understand Maddy better.

If you read both books, you’ll realize that Maddy’s story and Amelia’s don’t fit neatly together and it’s impossible to know exactly why Maddy decided to leave Reconstructing Amelia behind. It’s possible Maddy may have been drawing a parallel between herself and Amelia when it comes to the kinds of social pressure they were subject to through social media, their own expectations, the groups in which they participated and the assumptions of people around them.

June 2017 @BookOfTheMonth Delivery: Reviews Of The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo, White Fur And Dead Letters

Book Of The Month June 2017 Reviews On Novels And Nonfiction

Book Of The Month is a subscription service that sends you one hardcover book per month out of five selections for a low monthly subscription fee. You can add 2 more titles to your monthly delivery for $9.99 each, and the price overall is very cheap for full-size hardcovers.

Book Of The Month is not paying me to promote their service. I just love it so much that I’ve turned my monthly deliveries into a feature on my blog 🙂 I do encourage you to try it though, because if you like hardcovers it’s a great deal.

You can use my referral link to sign up if you’re interested in trying it. You’ll get your first three months for just $9.99 each plus a cute tote. And I’ll get a free book when you join. Win, win!

When it comes to my June 2017 Book Of The Month selections, I liked two of them and ended up not liking the third. I ended up giving The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid and White Fur by Jardine Libaire 3 star ratings because they were solid reads with interesting characters, while Dead Letters by Caite Dolan-Leach felt cheesy and overwrought, earning it a 2 star rating. Read my full reviews below!

Just Read: Review Of Death Of A Nationalist By Rebecca Pawel

Death Of A Nationalist Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

What I really love about participating in book clubs is that it can open you up to reading books you may have never considered otherwise. I’m part of a book club here in LA that is made up of alumnae of my college (Wellesley) and includes women of all generations who have a real passion for reading. Our conversations are always really interesting and the participants often bring unexpected book recommendations to the table.

Death Of A Nationalist is a novel I may never have even found out about without my Wellesley book club. Despite it’s 508 reviews and 4 star score on Goodreads, I probably normally would have passed over this first installment in a 4-part crime-mystery series set in Spain leading up to and during World War II. Though I wouldn’t rate this as my favorite book of all time, it turned out to be a really enjoyable read. Find out why below!

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