Tag: historical nonfiction

10 October 2018 Book Releases I’m Excited About

October 2018 Book Releases I'm Excited About On Novels And Nonfiction

There was quite the bounty of new novels released in October 2018, so I ended up going with 6 fiction and 4 nonfiction titles I’m likely going to pick up for this month’s post. There were some big releases that are not included in this list like the new Stephen King title – I had to make some hard decisions guys. The novels are all either historical fiction or contemporary fiction (or both! I’m looking at you Unsheltered by Barbara Kingsolver), while the nonfiction titles are more varied.

I’m pretty curious to see if any of the novels end up being Book Of The Month selections for October, and I have my fingers crossed that it ends up being some of the titles I really want to read but that I haven’t been able to access via Net Galley. If I was a betting person I would put my stakes on Bitter Orange by Claire Fuller (since they’ve featured a novel by her before) and Family Trust by Kathy Wang (because it’s their kind of contemporary novel). I guess we’ll have to wait till October 1st and see!

Just Read: The Mirage Factory by Gary Krist @garykrist @CrownPublishing

The Mirage Factory Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

I came across The Mirage Factory while looking for nonfiction books to include in my May 2018 Book Releases post. It was interest at first sight. I’ve lived in Los Angeles for over 10 years now and yet I felt that there was a lot I didn’t know about the city’s history. The idea of being able to learn more about such a crucial period in the metropolis’ development was immediately intriguing.

I ended up discovering a new favorite nonfiction writer. Krist was able to interview four different stories (LA’s, Mulholland’s, Griffith’s and Semple McPherson’s) into a single convincing narrative, and that’s darned impressive. It might help to love LA when reading this book, but I think it’s a good fit for anyone who likes historical nonfiction.

Just Read: Review Of Leonardo da Vinci by @WalterIsaacson @simonschuster

Leonardo Da Vinci Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

For an Italian, and especially a Milanese like I am, Leonardo da Vinci is kind of the ultimate cultural symbol. It’s true that he was born in Florence and spent part of his life there, but he also lived for multiple years at different points of his life in my hometown of Milan. While in Milan, under the protection either of the Sforza family or the conquering French, Leonardo had a significant impact on the city, from it’s canals to its artistic heritage.

Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs has been gathering dust on my shelf for a while now (I’ll get to it eventually), but when I learned he had published a biography of Leonardo da Vinci, I immediately felt drawn to reading it. The biography was wonderful (full review below) and it was such a great coincidence that I finished it just ahead of my yearly summer trip to Milan. You pretty much can’t round a corner in Milan without happening upon a Leonardo da Vinci exhibit or one of his works. I’m sharing some images from the Leonardo3 exhibit I attended a few days ago that featured spell-binding re-imaginings of some of the designs Leonardo left us for machines he envisioned.

10 September 2018 Book Releases I’m Excited About

September 2018 Book Releases On Novels And Nonfiction

Being home in Milan for the past 2 weeks has given me the opportunity to stockpile some blog posts, so I expect i’ll be posting regularly on the blog again going forward.

Here are my selections for September. As in prior months, I’ve selected 5 fiction and 5 nonfiction titles coming out in September 2018 that I’m potentially interested in reading. There’s a good mix of historical fiction, memoirs, politics and thrillers.

I’m trying to get my monthly release post started earlier in the prior month, so I can request any available titles on Net Galley and get the reviews for them out as close to the publication date as possible. I’ve receive ARC’s for two of the titles on this list so far (The Seclusion by Jacqui Castle and I Should Have Honor by Khalida Brohi), and I’ve finished the first and have started the second already. Hope you like my selections!

Guest Posting On Hungry Bookworm Site Today: 12 Memoirs For Nonfiction Newcomers

12 Great Memoirs For Nonfiction Newcomers

I’m really excited to have the opportunity to share a guest post today on the wonderful Megan’s blog The Hungry Bookworm. Since Megan primarily features fiction, and I tend to review a lot of nonfiction, I thought I would give some recommendations of nonfiction titles for readers who might not typically read nonfiction.

I decided to focus on memoirs because I find that they make great ‘gateway drugs’ for nonfiction newcomers. With their more personal and narrative style, they provide a much easier bridge into nonfiction for lovers of fictional stories. In fact, some of the stories within the memoirs I picked for this post are so incredible, they read like novels. Head over to The Hungry Bookworm to read my post!

#NonfictionNovember 2017 Week 5: Ten Nonfiction Titles Just Added To My TBR

Nonfiction Titles New To My TBR On Novels And Nonfiction

It’s the final week of Nonfiction November and the final topic was Nonfiction Reads New To My TBR and was hosted by Emerald City Book Review. I went back and looked through everyone’s Nonfiction November posts as well as comments on my own posts to sift through all the amazing recommendations I read and received throughout the month.

The titles I picked for this list mostly fall within topics for which I either want to create or update book lists next year (Russia, World War II, China and Fateful Voyages) and that I therefore hope to read soon. A few were books I’d heard of and considered reading in the past, but seeing them featured on a blog this month reminded me of them again – for example My Life In Middlemarch.

Thanks to everyone for all the TBR fodder this month and thanks to Sarah’s Book Shelves, Doing Dewey, Emerald City Book Review, Julz Reads and Sophisticated Dorkiness for doing such a great job of hosting – can’t wait for next year!

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