Tag: cannibalism

Just Read: Cannibalism – A Perfectly Natural History by Bill Schutt @draculae

Cannibalism Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

I know what you’re thinking. What’s up with this girl that she chose to read a book all about Cannibalism?  Or maybe if you’re a science geek like me, you’re just as fascinated by the topic. Believe it or not, whether you’re so grossed out about cannibalism that you would never choose to read about it or not, cannibalism is a natural part of the animal world. We, as humans, are kind of aberrations for having mostly abandoned it (though I’m pretty thankful that no one is planning to eat me).

When I included Cannibalism: A Perfectly Natural History in my February 2017 Releases list, I RAN to Net Galley to make sure I could score a copy, and I devoured the whole thing (no pun intended) in a couple of days. It’s everything that I love in books about a specific scientific topic – filled with disparate and enthralling examples, wide-ranging in its scope and yet super easy to follow, and most importantly, concisely written. If you love learning about science and about weird aspects of the life that surrounds you like me, pick this one up.

14 February 2017 Releases I’m Excited To Read #BookRelease

14 February 2017 Book Releases I'm Excited To Read On Novels And Nonfiction

February was definitely an easier month for which to pick a good number of new Nonfiction and Fiction releases that I’m excited about. I think January is typically a less active month in the publishing world, so I had a harder time ferreting titles out that I felt truly compelling. This month, on the other hand, I had to cull my list down from 20 titles or so to ones that I thought sounded the most interesting.

I would also add Claire Fuller’s Swimming Lessons to the list but I’ve already read it (here is my review). It was available to Book Of The Month subscribers as an exclusive and one of their five December 2016 picks, but will be released in hardcover to everyone else on February 7th 2017. I highly recommend it – the way in which the story is in part told through past letters written by the absent mother figure in the novel is fascinating.

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