Tag: caitlin moran

Summer 2017 Wrap-Up (Links To All 29 Books Reviewed)

Summer 2017 Wrap-Up On Novels And Nonfiction

Summer 2017 was a bit stop and go for me as far as book blogging is concerned, but I’m still happy with the volume of reviews I put out. You can find the full list below divided by category and organized by the rating I gave to each title.

For the Fall, what I’m hoping is that I’m able to post review/release content consistently about twice a week, and add a Links I Loved This Week post to the mix as well if I have time. I’m planning on starting a new feature called Book Pairings in which I will review one fiction and one nonfiction pick that have some kind of connection to each other. I already have 2 specific topics planned.

I ended up reading a total of 26 books in Summer 2017 and reviewed 29 books (11 Nonfiction, 11 Contemporary Fiction, 6 Historical Fiction and 1 Classic). The discrepancy between read books and reviewed books comes both from titles I read before the start of Summer 2017 that I reviewed during the summer, and titles that I read during Summer 2017 but that I haven’t reviewed yet.

Books I read towards the end of Summer 2017 and that I plan to review soon include: Dark Matter by Blake Crouch, The Uncommon Reader by Alan Bennett, What Made Maddy Run by Kate Fagan and Elizabeth: The Queen by Sally Bedell Smith.

You can see my full Books Read and TBR lists on my Goodreads page!

Winter 2017 Wrap Up

Winter 2017 Wrap-Up On Novels And Nonfiction

Winter 2017 was my second full season blogging on Novels And Nonfiction. I was going really strong until I was lucky enough to get an awesome brand new job, which understandably slowed my momentum slightly. I feel ready to pick back up now that I’ve adjusted to the new position though.

I ended up reading a total of 34 books in Winter 2017 (16 Nonfiction, 13 Contemporary Fiction, 4 Historical Fiction and 1 Classic). It was a little short of my goal of 40 books, but I’m very happy with the result.

I reviewed a total of 38 books in Winter 2017 (19 Nonfiction, 15 Contemporary Fiction, 3 Historical Fiction and 1 Classic). The discrepancy in the numbers between what I read and reviewed is due to the fact that I reviewed several books for my True Crime and Hillary Clinton Book Lists and Liane Moriarty Author Spotlight that I read in the past few years.

There are also a few books I read in Winter 2017 that I have yet to review, including: Alexander Hamilton by Ron Chernow, Worth It by Amanda Steinberg, Before The Rains by Dinah Jefferies and Cannibalism by Bill Schutt. Reviews for all of these are coming in the next few weeks.

Links I Loved This Week – 02/26/2017

Links I Loved This Week On Novels And Nonfiction

So you may have noticed things have been a bit quieter around the blog these past few weeks than normal. I haven’t had as much bandwidth for blogging after work and on the weekends because I just started out at a new job. It’s an amazing opportunity and super exciting, but like any new situation takes more mental and physical energy than normal. My time at home these days has been mostly spent sleeping and reading.

This has had the positive result of putting me in the position at the moment to be way ahead on my reading schedule, but behind on actual reviews. I have a lot of books to cover over the next few weeks that I’ve already read. I’m hoping to get back to a more regular schedule, but in the meantime thanks for understanding that things may be a bit slower than normal around here for a little while longer.

Being able to read everyone else’s posts and reviews has kept me in the book blog loop, however, which I’m very thankful for. Here are some of my favorite posts from this week.

Just Read: #HowToBeAWoman by @CaitlinMoran (Feminism 101 Series)

How To Be A Woman Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

A few weeks ago, after attending the Women’s March in LA, I put together a book list of books about Feminism that I wanted to read to provide a stronger educational framework for my understanding of feminism from a historical and intellectual perspective. Caitlin Moran’s hilarious book How To Be A Woman was featured on that list, and when the audiobook became available from my library holds list, I decided to start listening to it during my commutes. I was laughing out loud in my car from the start.

Moran has the gift of bringing a sensitive topic like that of feminism to the masses in a very accessible and down-to-earth way, but for those who are very sophisticated in their feminist views, it may seem simplistic. I think that in How To Be A Woman, Moran wasn’t trying to provide some kind of definitive ideological treatise about feminism, but wanted to share her experience growing up as a woman and a feminist, in a way that I, and I think many other women, will find relatable. Don’t expect statistics and valid historical commentary, but rather humorous anecdotes from Moran’s life that tie into feminist themes.

Feminism 101 Reading List – 16 Books To Educate Myself About Feminism

Feminism 101 Reading List On Novels And Nonfiction

On Saturday, I, like millions of other people in the U.S. and around the world, participated in the Women’s March (in LA) to stand up for women’s rights and against discrimination on the basis of race, gender identity or sexual preference. It was an incredibly inspiring morning, seeing so many people – men, women, children – come together to stand up for our shared values. Like others at marches around the globe, I was also protesting the new U.S. Presidential administration’s intentions to negatively impact women and minority groups through bigoted and backwards-looking policies (some of which we’re unfortunately already seeing enacted).

After the march, I read a lot of the coverage of this historic event, including different looks at how modern day feminism, in all its varied manifestations, fits more broadly into the history of feminism as a whole. I realized that though I firmly identify as a feminist, and I can articulate the reasons for which it’s still important to protect women’s rights, there’s a lot I don’t know about the history of feminism, its intersection with race, and the different forms it can take.

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