Tag: book recommendation

Book To Screen: Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

Crazy Rich Asians Book To Screen On Novels And Nonfiction

We’ve entered a bit of a Crazy Rich Asians craze these days – and deservedly so. I was very excited to see a movie with such a diverse Asian cast go into production and more recently to see it perform so well at the box office. It’s very encouraging to witness audiences continuing to respond positively to good story lines and interesting characters regardless of their origin.

When I decided to read Crazy Rich Asians a few weeks ago, so that I could review the book and the movie side by side, I wasn’t sure whether I would like the book. I’m definitely not a chick lit or romance novel fan, so I was worried it would feel much too superficial and light for me. I ended up finding the novel enjoyable though with some softer points, but the movie actually outdid the novel for me. It was the perfect, sweet, entertaining romance comedy, like the ones I loved to watch in the 1990s and 2000s that are rarely matched nowadays. Read more about my thoughts on the novel and movie below.

Just Read: Review Of Leonardo da Vinci by @WalterIsaacson @simonschuster

Leonardo Da Vinci Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

For an Italian, and especially a Milanese like I am, Leonardo da Vinci is kind of the ultimate cultural symbol. It’s true that he was born in Florence and spent part of his life there, but he also lived for multiple years at different points of his life in my hometown of Milan. While in Milan, under the protection either of the Sforza family or the conquering French, Leonardo had a significant impact on the city, from it’s canals to its artistic heritage.

Isaacson’s biography of Steve Jobs has been gathering dust on my shelf for a while now (I’ll get to it eventually), but when I learned he had published a biography of Leonardo da Vinci, I immediately felt drawn to reading it. The biography was wonderful (full review below) and it was such a great coincidence that I finished it just ahead of my yearly summer trip to Milan. You pretty much can’t round a corner in Milan without happening upon a Leonardo da Vinci exhibit or one of his works. I’m sharing some images from the Leonardo3 exhibit I attended a few days ago that featured spell-binding re-imaginings of some of the designs Leonardo left us for machines he envisioned.

Just Read: Review Of Call Of The Curlew by Elizabeth Brooks (Blog Tour) @ManxWriter

Call Of The Curlew Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

I’ve definitely fallen off my blogging schedule recently but, a while back, I had requested to participate in the blog tour for a historical mystery called Call Of The Curlew by Elizabeth Brooks. The blog tour was organized by Anne at Random Things Tours and the publisher was nice enough to send me a paperback ARC of the novel, which was just released at the end of June.

Iwas not familiar with the author but I was intrigued by the plot teaser and felt I would likely at least enjoy the novel. However, the book ended up far exceeding my expectations. Brook’s writing has strength and depth to it beyond what I would have thought to find in a run-of-the-mill historical mystery, and the atmosphere of the novel was suggestive enough to transport me to a cold dreary marsh even in these past sunny 90 degree heat days we’ve been having in LA. Find out more below!

LA Times Festival Of Books – Day 1 Recap @latimesfob

LA Times Festival Of Books Day 1 Recap On Novels And Nonfiction

So after a few weeks away from blogging due to focusing on work (and then getting sick for ALL of Memorial Day weekend – go me!), I’m coming back today with my first post to recap my experience at the LA Times Festival Of Books.

This year was not just my first time attending the festival, but also my first time attending a book festival of this size in general. I bought myself an All Access Pass (more on that below) and created a schedule of author conversations I wanted to attend (having to make some hard decisions along the way to see one set of authors versus another).

I had a really amazing time getting to see many authors I already loved or had heard of before in person, and listening to interesting conversations on literature, nonfiction, writing and reading. Weirdly enough, I saw mostly nonfiction authors on Day 1 and mostly fiction on Day 2. I’m splitting up my reviews of each day so I can do them justice. Day 2 should be up early next week. I hope you enjoy these recaps!

Just Read: Review Of A False Report By T. Christian Miller & Ken Armstrong @txtianmiller @bykenarmstrong

A False Report Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

I first decided to request an ARC of A False Report by T. Christian Miller & Ken Armstrong when I included it in my list of March 2018 releases I was looking forward to. In reality, it’s not the sort of book you look forward to picking up, as it obviously focuses on an extremely heavy topic.

Reading this book was an educational and eye-opening experience that solidified and deepened a lot of what I already knew about the difficulties that victims experience in reporting rape. It obviously comes with huge trigger warnings with regards to rape and violence. The authors don’t pull any punches in terms of tackling all the frightening details, but I think that for those who can stomach it, A False Report is a very important read.

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