Thanksgiving Read-A-Thon: Let The Games Begin #ThanksgivingReadathon

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Jackie at Death By Tsundoku and I are hosting a Thanksgiving Read-A-Thon this weekend (Wednesday through Sunday) to encourage ourselves and others to enjoy this free time to read. Join us on your blog, Twitter and Instagram by posting your reading intentions like I have, and/or using the hashtag #ThanksgivingReadathon. You are also welcome to include the image I created above in any of your posts and tweets. No pressure! Just follow along on Twitter and participate as much as you’d like.

I love having long stretches of vacation in which I really have the opportunity to make a good dent in my reading list. I’ll be spending Thanksgiving dinner with my best friend’s family, but because I’m Italian and my family is in Milan, I’ll have the rest of the weekend pretty much to myself if I choose.

I’d really like to use this holiday weekend to get a head start to stockpile some blog posts. I typically end up reading the book for a post only 2 or 3 days before the post is published, and also writing the post itself the night before (or morning of, eek!). In order to be less reactive in my blogging, I need to make some headway on my reading first.

Books I’m Thankful For – Thanksgiving #TopTenTuesday

Book's I'm Thankful For On Novels And Nonfiction

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly tag hosted by The Broke And Bookish. The theme for this week was things or books you are thankful for.

Books amuse us, lift our spirits, ease our boredom, inform us and help us plumb the depths of human experience. It was pretty easy for me to pick out titles that I’ve treasured in the past and still think of as friendly pages I can return to. I decided to put together a post on books I’m thankful for in two different categories.

Childhood books I’m thankful for were ones which took me outside the significantly sheltered world I lived in, into unfamiliar historical and natural settings like the American wilderness, enchanted woods where animals came to life or Ancient Egypt. Among my All Time books I’m thankful for are classic novels with strong female characters and the two nonfiction books that really got me into reading more nonfiction.

Hope everyone has a great Thanksgiving weekend and make sure to check out the Top Ten Tuesday linkup at The Broke And Bookish to see everyone else’s posts for the week.

North Korea Book List – Memoirs And Histories Of A Dictatorship #NonFicNov

North Korea Book List Post On Novels And Nonfiction

Nonfiction November is being hosted by Doing Dewey, Emerald City Book Review, Sarah’s Book Shelves, Hibernator’s Library and Julz Reads this year. Make sure to check out the home page for the event this week and each of the host’s blogs for the themed linkups they are running. It’s a great way to discover new book blogs and get great nonfiction book recommendations.

The theme for Week 4 is Be The Expert/Ask The Expert/Become The Expert – and I decided to recommend books about North Korea since it’s a topic on which I’ve read pretty widely. I’m no ‘expert’ on it, but I think I’ve probably delved into the topic more than the average reader, and all the memoirs and historical nonfiction titles I’ve read about North Korea have been harrowing but also incredibly unforgettable reads that I would recommend to anyone.

Links I Loved This Week – 11/18/16

Links I Loved On Novels And Nonfiction

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  • I think we could see this one coming but Colson Whitehead won the National Book Award for fiction for his celebrated book The Underground Railroad. I’m ashamed to confess I haven’t read it yet, despite the fact that it’s pretty much all I’ve been hearing about. Here’s a timely review on Lindsay’s Library if you needed any more reason to pick it up – I’m finally going to.

Nonfiction Vs. Fiction – Victoria: The Queen by Julia Baird and Victoria by Daisy Goodwin – #NonFicNov

Nonfiction Vs Fiction Reviews Of Victoria On Novels And Nonfiction
Nonfiction November is being hosted by Doing Dewey, Emerald City Book Review, Sarah’s Book Shelves, Hibernator’s Library and Julz Reads this year. Make sure to check out the home page for the event this week and each of the host’s blogs for the themed linkups they are running. It’s a great way to discover new book blogs and get great nonfiction book recommendations.

The theme for Week 3 is Book Pairings – matching up a nonfiction title with a fictional one on a similar topic. I was lucky enough to receive two Net Galley ARC’s for November 2016 releases on Queen Victoria – one the biography of the queen by Julia Baird, and the other a fictionalized version of the younger years of the queen’s life by Daisy Goodwin. Both are going to be released on November 22nd.

I actually read each book intermittently, switching at the end of each chapter from one to the other. I tend to read this way as a habit sometimes, alternating between chapters of a nonfiction and a fiction title, but it was definitely an interesting experience to read two books this way on the same topic. I think having the biographical information to support my reading of the fictionalized version of Victoria’s life really added to the experience, though ultimately I loved the biography and didn’t like the novel as much.

Just Read: All The Single Ladies by Rebecca Traister #NonFicNov

All The Single Ladies Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

Rebecca Traister is an award-winning journalist and writer at large for New York Magazine who focuses on women in politics, media, and entertainment from a feminist perspective. In the wake of last Tuesday’s discouraging loss for Hillary Clinton and women’s equality in America, Traister wrote a moving article about Clinton’s loss that reflected on how white women failed to support a candidate that represented a huge step forward for women’s rights.

The media has been feverishly trying to justify how wrong they and all the polls were on the election’s outcome, but they’ve also generally avoided saying the obvious. Clinton lost because she is a woman. As Traister writes in her article “Few seem eager to examine the possibility that certain segments of America simply do not want to be led by a woman, and that almost every other explanation for what was wrong with [Clinton] — her high negatives, reputation for being untrustworthy, the email mess — originates with the ways she has been systematically demonized her whole career for being a threatening woman.” There were certainly many other factors at play, but ultimately this was yet another instance of an over-qualified female losing out on a job to an embarrassingly under-qualified male.

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