Just Read: Educated by Tara Westover (Audiobook Review) @tarawestover @randomhouse

Educated Audiobook Review On Novels And Nonfiction

Educated is one of those memoirs that is able to bridge the gap into nonfiction for people who typically only read fiction. As for other memoirs, the personal nature of the story is what makes it more accessible to those who don’t normally delve into nonfiction. Westover’s memoir in particular, however, is so unbelievable in its extremity that it often actually reads like fiction.

That is why there has been so much buzz about this title in the book blogging world – it really crosses the lines between genres in a way that makes it universally appealing. It’s sort of the ultimate redemption story. I listened to the audiobook version and found it a very powerful delivery, though a few times I found myself mouth-agape in my car, in disbelief at what I was listening to. Find out more of my thoughts on the memoir in my full review.

Just Read: I Should Have Honor by Khalida Brohi @KhalidaBrohi @randomhouse

I Should Have Honor Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

The title I’m reviewing today – I Should Have Honor by Khalida Brohi – was one of my selections for my September 2018 post on new releases that I was excited about. I’ve been trying to read books on the experience of women living in Middle Eastern (and adjacent) countries, all of which have been equal parts upsetting and inspiring.

My plan is to eventually to put together a book list of these titles – mostly memoirs – and to include I Should Have Honor in that list. I didn’t want to wait till then to review Khalida Brohi’s memoir, however, both because it was a Net Galley ARC and because I wanted to give you insight into my thoughts on it sooner.

Madeline Miller Author Spotlight: Reviews Of The Song Of Achilles And Circe @MillerMadeline

Madeline Miller Author Spotlight 1

It’s a little hard to be involved in any way in the book world and to not have heard of Madeline Miller. She really came into my radar as an author when I started to hear about the release of her second novel Circe earlier this year. Shortly afterwards I found out that she was being featured in a talk at the LA Times Book Festival. I hadn’t yet read her books but I knew she was a popular author with a rabid fan following, so I jumped at the chance to see her speak.

She opened the segment by reading a passage from Circe that absolutely blew me away for the power and strength of the writing (I’ve included the whole passage in my review below). It literally gave me goosebumps, and right away I knew I needed to read both her books. I’ve been recommending them (especially The Song Of Achilles) ever since and I’m officially a life long fan of her work. Read my full reviews of both of her novels below.

Just Read: The Book Of Essie by Meghan MacLean Weir @MeghanWeir

The Book Of Essie Book Review On Novels And Nonfiction

I selected The Book Of Essie as my June 2018 Book Of The Month pick, and then added two more books to my shipment for that month – The Kiss Quotient by Helen Hoang and a copy of Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman. I’ve made no secret of the fact that I’ve read and absolutely loved Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine (my rave review here). I just added it to my June Book Of The Month box so I could have a hardcover copy of the novel at home, since I originally read it as a library ebook.

Since I ended up DNFing The Kiss Quotient only 4 or 5 chapters in (unreadable for me because of the cringe-worthy romance novel writing), I decided to just review The Book Of Essie as a stand alone post instead of putting together a whole June 2018 Book Of The Month post.

The Book Of Essie made up for my not being able to get through The Kiss Quotient. It was a complex novel that captivated my interest with an original premise and enough plot twists to keep me reading. See why I gave it 4 stars in my review.

Just Read: The Seclusion by Jacqui Castle @JCastleWrites @Inkshares

The Seclusion Book Review 1

I had a lot of new novels to choose from when I was picking five fiction titles to include in my September Book Releases post, and The Seclusion was a relatively unlikely candidate. It’s a debut novel from a new author but has been racking up positive reviews on Goodreads and had what I felt was going to be a captivating and currently relevant premise.

Turns out I was right! I found reading The Seclusion equal parts fun and disturbing. The dystopian future in which the narrative is set is plausible enough and sufficiently related to our current political situation to be extra creepy. The book ends with a final cliff-hanger that left me wanting more. Read my full review to find out why.

Book To Screen: Crazy Rich Asians by Kevin Kwan

Crazy Rich Asians Book To Screen On Novels And Nonfiction

We’ve entered a bit of a Crazy Rich Asians craze these days – and deservedly so. I was very excited to see a movie with such a diverse Asian cast go into production and more recently to see it perform so well at the box office. It’s very encouraging to witness audiences continuing to respond positively to good story lines and interesting characters regardless of their origin.

When I decided to read Crazy Rich Asians a few weeks ago, so that I could review the book and the movie side by side, I wasn’t sure whether I would like the book. I’m definitely not a chick lit or romance novel fan, so I was worried it would feel much too superficial and light for me. I ended up finding the novel enjoyable though with some softer points, but the movie actually outdid the novel for me. It was the perfect, sweet, entertaining romance comedy, like the ones I loved to watch in the 1990s and 2000s that are rarely matched nowadays. Read more about my thoughts on the novel and movie below.

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