12 March 2017 Releases I’m Excited To Read – #BookRelease

12 March 2017 Book Releases I'm Excited To Read On Novels And Nonfiction

Another month, another list of a dozen books I hope to find time to read someday! The FOMO is strong with these ones, but I’m trying to be realistic about how fast I can get through books and how fast I can also post about them. I may only read half of these at some point in the next few months, but I found all of these titles deserving of mention.

I hope you’ll find something in my list that’ll catch your eye and luckily enough, most of these titles are currently available for request on Net Galley (a resource for book bloggers and reviewers to get access to ebook versions of books for free in return for honest reviews), so I encourage you to look them up and request them if you’re interested.

Nonfiction Banner On Novels And Nonfiction
Shoot Like A Girl Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionShoot Like A Girl 
by Mary Jennings Hegar

Publication Date: March 7th 2017
Publisher: New American Library (Penguin-Berkley)

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

On June 29, 2009, Air National Guard major Mary Jennings “MJ” Hegar was shot down while on a Medevac mission on her third tour in Afghanistan. Despite being wounded, she fought the enemy and saved the lives of her crew and their patients. But soon she would face a new battle: to give women who serve on the front lines the credit they deserve. It was on American soil that Hegar would embark on her greatest challenge—to eliminate the military’s Ground Combat Exclusion Policy, which kept female armed service members from officially serving in combat roles despite their long-standing record of doing so with honor.

Why I’m Interested

I don’t know a lot about the experiences of women serving in the military aside from the fact that there has been a history of discrimination and even abuse against them. If you’ve been reading the news recently, you will have heard of the photo scandal that is sweeping the Marines. A large group of men from the force were involved in inappropriately and arguably illegally sharing nude or provocative pictures of their female colleagues through a Facebook group. Clearly, the path for full equality for women in the military is still a long one, but I’m impressed by Mary Jennings Hergar’s story and would be honored to read about her trailblazing achievements for women in the armed services. This is one of the titles from this month’s post that I’ll be requesting ASAP on Net Galley.


We A Manifesto For Women Everywhere Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionWe: A Manifesto For Women Everywhere by Gillian Anderson and Jennifer Nadel

Publication Date: March 7th 2017
Publisher: Atria Books

Kindle     Hardcover    Paperback

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

Imagine a sisterhood—across all creeds and cultures. An unspoken agreement that we, as women, will support and encourage one another. That we will remember we don’t know what struggles each of us may be facing elsewhere in our lives and so we will assume that each of us is doing our best. So begins We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere — an inspiring, empowering, and provocative manifesto for change. Change that we can all effect, one woman at a time. Change that provides a crucial and timely antidote to the “have-it-all” superwoman culture and instead focuses on what will make each and every one of us happier and more free.

Why I’m Interested

I was a bit unsure about this one because a celebrity – Gillian Anderson from The X-Files – is one of the authors. At the same time, I feel that Anderson is a positive female celebrity role model among so many negative options. She’s allowed herself to age gracefully in an industry that frowns upon wrinkles and has portrayed strong female characters in the TV series she has participated in. I was also unaware that Anderson has authored books before – she has science fiction novel series called The Earthend Saga. I may end up adding We: A Manifesto For Women Everywhere to Feminism 101 reading list.


The Inheritance Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Inheritance by Niki Kapsambelis

Publication Date: March 7th 2017
Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

Every sixty-nine seconds, someone is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Of the top ten killers, it is the only disease for which there is no cure or treatment. For most people, there is nothing that they can do to fight back. But one family is doing all they can. The DeMoe family has the most devastating form of the disease that there is: early onset Alzheimer’s, an inherited genetic mutation that causes the disease in 100 percent of cases, and has a 50 percent chance of being passed onto the next generation. Of the six DeMoe children whose father had it, five have inherited the gene. But rather than give up in the face of such news, the DeMoes have agreed to spend their precious, abbreviated years as part of a worldwide study that could utterly change the landscape of Alzheimer’s research and offers the brightest hope for future treatments—and possibly a cure.

Why I’m Interested

It’s possible that I felt immediately interested in this book because I’m currently rewatching Grey’s Anatomy and I’m at the part of the series in which Meredith and Derek are conducting an Alzheimer’s trial. Or maybe it’s because I love medical nonfiction, and especially deep dives into particular diseases a la Emperor Of All Maladies. I’m hoping that in this book, Kapsambelis provides the right balance between scientific details on Alzheimers and personal histories of affected patients, like Siddhartha Mukherjee was able to do so perfectly in his history of cancer research.


Irresistible Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionIrresistible by Adam Alter

Publication Date: March 7th 2017
Publisher: Penguin Press

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

Welcome to the age of behavioral addiction—an age in which half of the American population is addicted to at least one behavior. We obsess over our emails, Instagram likes, and Facebook feeds; we binge on TV episodes and YouTube videos; we work longer hours each year; and we spend an average of three hours each day using our smartphones. Half of us would rather suffer a broken bone than a broken phone, and Millennial kids spend so much time in front of screens that they struggle to interact with real, live humans. In this revolutionary book, Adam Alter, a professor of psychology and marketing at NYU, tracks the rise of behavioral addiction, and explains why so many of today’s products are irresistible.

Why I’m Interested

I have to be honest that I thought this book would be the perfect way to merge my actual work life and my blog life. Two birds with one stone. I work in TV research, and part of my job is to keep up to date with technological developments and new social science research that looks into people’s experiences with media and technology. I find my iPhone, the internet and TV pretty irresistible myself, and a sociology major, I’m really interested in reading Alter’s opinions of why these mediums have become the focus of our lives. This one is no longer available from Net Galley, so I’m going to request it from the library instead.


 The Polygamist's Daughter Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Polygamist’s Daughter by Anna LeBaron

Publication Date: March 21st 2017
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers

Kindle    Paperback

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

“My father had more than fifty children.”So begins the haunting memoir of Anna LeBaron, daughter of the notorious polygamist and murderer Ervil LeBaron. With her father wanted by the FBI for killing anyone who tried to leave his cult–a radical branch of Mormonism–Anna and her siblings were constantly on the run with the other sister-wives. Often starving and always desperate, the children lived in terror. Even though there were dozens of them together, Anna always felt alone. She escaped when she was thirteen, but the nightmare was far from over.

Why I’m Interested

I’ve received a copy of this book to review from book review service Edelweiss and I’m really looking forward to read it. I’ve read several books about polygamist cults already, including the one that is focused on in this title. I think the reason I’m so fascinated by polygamy is similar to the reason that I devour anything having to do with Scientology. It’s the sociologist in me that is fascinated by these extreme modes of living, in which the individual’s importance is subsumed to that of an organization or movement. I think I may end up creating a Polygamist Memoir book list so that I can direct people to the most comprehensive and interesting of the memoirs I’ve read on the topic.


City Of Light City Of Poison Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionCity Of Light, City Of Poison by Holly Tucker

Publication Date: March 21st 2017
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

Appointed to conquer the “crime capital of the world,” the first police chief of Paris faces an epidemic of murder in the late 1600s. Assigned by Louis XIV, Nicolas de La Reynie begins by clearing the streets of filth and installing lanterns throughout Paris, turning it into the City of Light. As La Reynie continues his investigations, he is haunted by a single question: Could Louis’s mistresses be involved in such nefarious plots? The pragmatic and principled La Reynie must decide just how far he will go to protect his king. From secret courtrooms to torture chambers, City of Light, City of Poison is a gripping true-crime tale of deception and murder.

Why I’m Interested

True Crime meets Paris. As a true crime fan, a historical nonfiction fan, a European and a member of the Paris bandwagon, this books sounds like it hits all the right spots for me. I don’t know a lot about how police or investigations operated at the time of Louis XIV, but it’s definitely one of the periods of French history that is most captivating to the imagination. The plot teaser for this book left me wondering whether Louis XIV mistresses would actually be found to have participated in some murderous plot or not. Apparently Holly Tucker has written another book on the history of the first blood transfusions which sounds even more interesting to me, so I may have to tackle that one first.


Fiction Banner On Novels And Nonfiction

In Farleigh Field Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionIn Farleigh Field by Rhys Bowen

Publication Date: March 1st 2017
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing

Kindle    Paperback    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

World War II comes to Farleigh Place, the ancestral home of Lord Westerham and his five daughters, when a soldier with a failed parachute falls to his death on the estate. After his uniform and possessions raise suspicions, MI5 operative and family friend Ben Cresswell is covertly tasked with determining if the man is a German spy. The assignment also offers Ben the chance to be near Lord Westerham’s middle daughter, Pamela, whom he furtively loves. But Pamela has her own secret: she has taken a job at Bletchley Park, the British code-breaking facility. As Ben follows a trail of spies and traitors, which may include another member of Pamela’s family, he discovers that some within the realm have an appalling, history-altering agenda. Can he, with Pamela’s help, stop them before England falls?

Why I’m Interested

The last World War II novel I read was All The Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr, and talk about leaving a topic on a high note. Based on the reviews for In Farleigh Field on Goodreads, I’m expecting it to be nothing like All The Light We Cannot See. It doesn’t sound like literary fiction, but like a lighter historical fiction novel instead which promises mystery, investigations, fast-paced action and an intricate and entertaining cast of characters. Not every book needs to make you feel all the feels, and In Farleigh Field sounds like the perfect way to escape reality for a weekend.


The Roanoke Girls Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Roanoke Girls by Amy Engel

Publication Date: March 7th 2017
Publisher: Crown

Kindle    Paperback    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

After her mother’s suicide, fifteen year-old Lane Roanoke came to live with her grandparents and fireball cousin, Allegra, on their vast estate in rural Kansas. Lane knew little of her mother’s mysterious family, but when she discovered the dark truth at the heart of the family, she ran fast and far away. Eleven years later, Lane is adrift in Los Angeles when her grandfather calls to tell her Allegra has gone missing. Did she run too? Or something worse? Unable to resist his pleas, Lane returns to help search, and to ease her guilt at having left Allegra behind. Her homecoming may mean a second chance with the boyfriend whose heart she broke that long ago summer. But it also means facing the devastating secret that made her flee, one she may not be strong enough to run from again.

Why I’m Interested

I’ve heard so much about The Roanoke Girls in the last few months and even read a few advanced reviews (like this one on Keeper Of Pages). The book has a high rating on Goodreads and its premise sounded mysterious enough in the plot teaser that it caught my interest. What is the secret that made Lane abandon her family and a life of luxury as one of the rich and beautiful Roanoke girls? Apparently the book has both a thriller and a cult aspect to it, which aren’t fleshed out in the plot teaser. Now that I know I am definitely in.


All Grown Up Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionAll Grown Up by Jami Attenberg

Publication Date: March 7th 2017
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

From the New York Times best-selling author of The Middlesteins comes a wickedly funny novel about a thirty-nine-year-old single, childfree woman who defies convention as she seeks connection. Who is Andrea Bern? When her therapist asks the question, Andrea knows the right things to say: she’s a designer, a friend, a daughter, a sister. But it’s what she leaves unsaid—she’s alone, a drinker, a former artist, a shrieker in bed, captain of the sinking ship that is her flesh—that feels the most true. Everyone around her seems to have an entirely different idea of what it means to be an adult. But when Andrea’s niece finally arrives, born with a heartbreaking ailment, the Bern family is forced to reexamine what really matters. Will this drive them together or tear them apart?

Why I’m Interested

This was my March 2017 pick for Book Of The Month. I chose it over the other titles of the month because I felt that I would relate to the book’s topic and the main character. Like Andrea Bern, I’m in my thirties, single, and figuring out what it means to be an adult. I may not have a drinking problem or see myself reflected in all aspects of Andrea’s personality, but I feel like there definitely will be something for me in this novel. I’m looking forward to reviewing it next month in my usual Book Of The Month post.


The Wanderers Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Wanderers by Meg Howrey

Publication Date: March 14th 2017
Publisher: G.P. Putnam’s Sons

Kindle    Paperback    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

Station Eleven meets The Martian in this brilliantly inventive novel about three astronauts training for the first-ever mission to Mars, an experience that will push the boundary between real and unreal, test their relationships, and leave each of them—and their families—changed forever. In four years Prime Space will put the first humans on Mars. Helen Kane, Yoshi Tanaka, and Sergei Kuznetsov must prove they’re the crew for the job by spending seventeen months in the most realistic simulation every created. As the days turn into months the line between what is real and unreal becomes blurred, and the astronauts learn that the complications of inner space are no less fraught than those of outer space.

Why I’m Interested

I have yet to read Station Eleven but I’ve heard so many wonderful things about it, and I absolutely loved The Martian, so when I read that The Wanderers was a mesh of the two I was immediately intrigued. I’m particularly into the idea that the novel unrolls during the training space for a Martian mission, and that the three astronauts who are the main characters are from different countries. I’m imaging that being sequestered in a simulation of a trip on Mars for months may do some pretty interesting things to the human mind, so I’m definitely in.


The Tea Girl Of Hummingbird Lane Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Tea Girl Of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

Publication Date: March 21st 2017
Publisher: Scribner

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

Li-yan and her family align their lives around the seasons and the farming of tea. There is ritual and routine, and it has been ever thus for generations. Then one day a jeep appears at the village gate—the first automobile any of them have seen—and a stranger arrives. Li-yan, one of the few educated girls on her mountain, translates for the stranger and is among the first to reject the rules that have shaped her existence. When she has a baby outside of wedlock, rather than stand by tradition, she wraps her daughter in a blanket, with a tea cake hidden in her swaddling, and abandons her in the nearest city. A powerful story about a family, separated by circumstances, culture, and distance, Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane paints an unforgettable portrait of a little known region and its people and celebrates the bond that connects mothers and daughters.

Why I’m Interested

Lisa See’s prior novels have been on my TBR list for a while now. I read her memoir On Gold Mountain, about her family’s experience immigrating to America and establishing a successful furniture business in Los Angeles. It was a truly eye opening read on the Asian American immigrant experience and also on Chinese culture and I’d highly recommend it. I think my plan is to read several of Lisa See’s novels and put together an Author Spotlight on her, in which case The Tea Girl Of Hummingbird Lane will definitely be included.


The Twelve Lives Of Samuel Hawley Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Twelve Lives Of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti

Publication Date: March 28th 2017
Publisher: Dial Press

Kindle    Hardcover

Plot Teaser (from Goodreads)

After years spent living on the run, Samuel Hawley moves with his teenage daughter, Loo, to Olympus, Massachusetts. There, in his late wife’s hometown, Hawley finds work as a fisherman, while Loo struggles to fit in at school and grows curious about her mother’s mysterious death. Haunting them both are twelve scars Hawley carries on his body, from twelve bullets in his criminal past; a past that eventually spills over into his daughter’s present, until together they must face a reckoning yet to come. This father-daughter epic weaves back and forth through time and across America, from Alaska to the Adirondacks.

Why I’m Interested

I think Modern Mrs Darcy may have recommended this about eight million times on her podcast, What Should I Read Next. I was able to get a Net Galley of it and I actually started reading, it but decided to stop about 10% in because I had other reading priorities for the blog. I was starting to get into it towards the end of the section I read, but at first I wasn’t sure if it would really captivate me. I would give this one 50 to 100 pages to really grab your attention. I’ll definitely be going back to it in a few weeks, once I’ve completed my reading for some other posts I have planned.


What March 2017 releases are you looking forward to most?

You can also check out my previous posts on February 2017January 2017December 2016 and November 2016 releases for more recent recommendations.

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  23 comments for “12 March 2017 Releases I’m Excited To Read – #BookRelease

  1. Tina Woodbury
    March 12, 2017 at 12:42 am

    Oh my goodness you have a lot of great books listed here! Most of the fiction ones are on my TBR list. First up for me will be Tea Girl Of Hummingbird Lane. I look forward to your reading your reviews on these.

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 12, 2017 at 5:29 pm

      I hope you like it! Obviously Lisa See has had a lot of acclaim for her prior books. Have you read any of them? I think I’m planning on starting with Snowflower.

      Like

      • Tina Woodbury
        March 12, 2017 at 9:55 pm

        Snow Flower and the Secret Fan is the only one I have read by her…so far. I really like it! I hope you do too 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. March 12, 2017 at 8:38 am

    Ohh interesting non-fiction books! Thanks for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 12, 2017 at 5:28 pm

      You’re welcome 🙂 there’s less nonfiction in the book blog world, and since I read almost more of it than fiction, I try to share as much as I can!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Annie
    March 12, 2017 at 9:46 am

    I’m also reading The 12 lives of Samuel Hawley soon! The Polygamist’s Daughter sounds great :O

    Liked by 1 person

  4. March 12, 2017 at 12:37 pm

    Some great books on this list! I’m looking forward to the Roanoke Girls and The Polygamist’s Daughter too 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sarah's Book Shelves
    March 12, 2017 at 1:58 pm

    I LOVED All Grown Up and, having been single in NYC at one time (though I was in my 20’s), I could relate a bit. Hope you love it too! And The Roanoke Girls was the kind of book I was embarrassed that I actually liked, but couldn’t put down.

    I’ve got Samuel Hawley waiting for me too and have heard great things (though missed it on MMD podcast).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Sarah's Book Shelves
      March 12, 2017 at 1:58 pm

      Also – I didn’t realize The Wanderers was a cross between Station Eleven and The Martian – I loved both! Will have to check that out.

      Liked by 1 person

      • March 12, 2017 at 5:26 pm

        Yes! Hearing that made it immediately appeal to me though weirdly I’ve read neither, but I’ve watched The Martian movie and loved it!

        Like

    • March 12, 2017 at 5:27 pm

      I’ve hear mixed reviews for The Roanoke girls so maybe it’s just the kind of book you need to go into with low expectations 🙂

      Like

  6. March 12, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    I’m very much looking forward to Samuel Hawley! Great selection youve got for March:) Enjoy all those!!

    Like

  7. March 12, 2017 at 7:00 pm

    Some great books here. Love reading about the non-fiction books especially as I often don’t catch these. From the fiction choices I really want to read The Roanoke Girls.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. March 13, 2017 at 1:10 am

    So excited for The Wanderers! I loved Station Eleven and The Martian, so this one’s a no brainer. Hopefully it lives up to the comparison! Great list, and hope you’re enjoying the new job!

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 13, 2017 at 4:34 am

      Yes! It’s been good so far 🙂 just more tired when I get home because of the adjustment so keeping up with blogging has been difficult. But it’s a small sacrifice to pay for a good change!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. March 14, 2017 at 9:51 am

    I’m really interested in The Roanoke Girls and The Wanderers! They both sound super interesting. Hopefully we’ll both enjoy them 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  10. March 20, 2017 at 2:27 pm

    I love reading lists like this; there are always so many great new books for me! I *did* know Gillian Anderson wrote a sci-fi trilogy (but I haven’t read it). I wonder the reason why We: A Manifesto for Women Everywhere has a second author when Anderson is already published. That alone makes me intrigued to read it. Plus, well, feminism! Shoot Like a Girl is also being added to my TBR for similar reasons. As far as fiction goes, I only recently discovered Lisa See; I can’t wait to read her next book!

    I try really hard not to look a upcoming releases, unless they are something I’ve been desperately waiting for. my TBR is too long as it is! I wait until reviews come in before I commit myself. So, no anticipated releases for me this month. Maybe in the future. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 26, 2017 at 6:26 am

      Yes, my monthly new releases posts are a minefield for my ever-expanding TBR as well :/ But I enjoy writing them and keeping abreast of what is being published. It’s hard for me to do that unless I pick a time each month to look into it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • March 28, 2017 at 9:41 pm

        That’s really smart. I like that you have a strategy for this. I feel like I’d definitely get lost down a rabbit hole of to-be-published books. For now, I’ll just stick to stalking you. 😉

        Like

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