12 January 2017 Book Releases I’m Looking Forward To #BookReleases

January 2017 Book Releases On Novels And Nonfiction

This post is coming one day late because I somehow got confused with my days between being on vacation and the time difference from Milan to LA, and I didn’t realize until too late that yesterday was actually Monday. Oops!

While you read this I’ll be enjoying my last day home visiting my family (we’re planning polpette for dinner), and then I’ll be on my way back to Los Angeles to get 2017 started for real. Back to work and also time to get started on those resolutions. If you’re starting to plan for your 2017 Reading Challenges and setting Reading Goals for the year, here are some titles coming out this month that you can consider adding to your TBR list.

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The Unsettlers Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Unsettlers by Mark Sundeen

Published: January 10th 2017

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This book follows different individuals and families that have chosen to live an ethically and ecologically minded life in America by engaging in homesteading, urban farming and other similar subsistence living practices. Though I’m far from living a subsistence lifestyle, I am growing more concerned about the amount of refuse I produce as an individual and also issues of food scarcity around the world. I’m also very interested in the concept of homesteading (see my obsession with the TV show Alaska: The Last Frontier) and abandoning city life to go back to live off the land. This book sounds like it would be a good overview of the different ways in which people in America are reconsidering expected patterns of living in modern life.


Storm In A Teacup Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionStorm In A Teacup by Helen Czerski

Published: January 10th 2017

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Physics was never my forte in high school (though to be honest I was much worse at Chemistry), but I’m fascinated by any science book that promises to make complex scientific topics accessible and to link them to phenomena that we witness in everyday life. The author of this book, Helen Czerski, is a physicist who connects mundane occurences like popcorn popping and coffee stains, or looming realities like climate change and the energy crisis, to the physics concepts that control them. I think this book has the potential to be similar to the excellent Stuff Matters by Mark Miodownik.


The End Of The Asian Century Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe End Of The Asian Century by Michael R. Auslin

Published: January 10th 2017

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I have a booklist on China planned for March, so when I noticed this title coming out in January I was immediately interested. Several of the books currently on my booklist focus on declaiming China’s economic growth and elaborating on expectations that China will surpass the U.S. in terms of global importance – if it hasn’t already. Auslin’s book provides a different take – one in which China is viewed on the decline rather than as still rising. Even without reading the book I know there will be aspects of it with which I disagree (China’s virtual economic colonization of Africa is still very much ongoing after all) but I’m interested in reading this alternate view.


Once We Were Sisters Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionOnce We Were Sisters by Sheila Kohler

Published: January 17th 2017

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In this memoir, thirty-seven year old Sheila Kohler finds out that her sister has been killed in a car accident and flies back to their home country of South Africa to seek answers about her sister’s death. Coming to terms with the tragedy leads Kohler to reconsider their upbringing, marred by another early tragedy – the death of their father. After  a childhood of displacement and loss, Kohler and her sister both ended up marrying young, but their lives ultimately took very different turns, with Kohler leaving South Africa and her sister staying behind. I have a sister I’m very close to, and though this memoir starts with a tragedy we all hope never to experience, it also sounds like a bittersweet and poignant exploration of the special nature of sisterly love.


Gosnell Book Cover On Novels And Nonfiction

Gosnell: The Untold Story Of America’s Most Prolific Seral Killer by Ann McElhinney and Phelim McAleer

Published: January 24th 2017

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This book should probably come with a trigger warning. I’m definitely a sucker for a good True Crime story, but this one sounds pretty horrific and not for the fainthearted. It’s the story of Dr. Kermit Gosnell, a surgeon from an abortion clinic in Pennsylvania who is now serving life in prison without the possibility of parole for the murder of three infants and one woman. The infants were born alive during attempted abortions and Gosnell ended their lives in a horrific manner I won’t detail. Essentially, Gosnell is a monster who preyed on desperate women and conducted illegal late-term abortions while Pennsylvania regulators failed to act through years of complaints. A ghastly but important story to hear.


I Call Myself A Feminist Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionI Call Myself A Feminist Edited by Pepe, Holmes, Annette, Mosse and Stride

Published: January 31st 2017

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I’m reading a collection of essays on Hillary Clinton’s first campaign for President and I’ve realized I really like the format of a series of essays written by different authors on one topic. I enjoy when a collection of this type has been edited in order to provide many varied viewpoints that branch out in different directions from a central focal point. I Call Myself A Feminist is an essay collection in which twenty-five young female authors, journalists, activists, comedians and more were asked what it means to them to be a feminist. The themes chosen by each contributor include becoming a feminist, how being Muslim informs feminism, and why women don’t have to be perfect (thankfully). A highly topical read that I think will make me reflect on why and in which ways I consider myself a feminist.

 

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Difficult Women Book Cover On Novels And Nonfiction

Difficult Women by Roxane Gay

Published: January 3rd 2017

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I was lucky enough to score a Net Galley ARC of Difficult Women last month, and I have a review planned for mid-January. It’s a collection of short stories about women, though the women within them come for all sorts of backgrounds and have different life experiences. Roxane Gay includes strippers, twins, engineers and neighbors experiencing regret for past crimes, interstate moves, emotional blackmail and even a female fight club. I’m interested to see how significantly the stories differ from each other and in which ways they may also be related. I was able to purchases Roxane Gay’s prior collection of nonfiction essays Bad Feminist when Amazon discounted it on Kindle a few days ago, and if I have time to read that as well I may turn my post on Difficult Women into a double-review.


History Of Wolves Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionHistory Of Wolves by Emily Fridlund

Published: January 3rd 2017

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History Of Wolves is a debut novel that has already received some significant critical acclaim. It’s under 300 pages, so it would make for a relatively quick read. The story follows Linda, a teenager, who lives in a nearly abandoned commune in the woods of Minnesota with her parents. Linda struggles to fit in at school and among friends and neighbors due to the sense of isolation and difference that she’s experienced growing up in the commune. When a young family moves in across the lake from Linda’s family’s house, Linda ends up babysitting for their little boy, until something occurs that will end up having an effect on Linda for the rest of her life. The novel’s rustic setting intrigues me, and I think it’ll probably turn out to be one of those quiet but powerful books I tend to love.


The Sleepwalker Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThe Sleepwalker by Chris Bohjalian

Published: January 10th 2017

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The Sleepwalker is a thriller based on the disappearance of a middle-aged woman named Annalee Ahlberg who suffers from parasomnia or sleepwalking. Annalee’s sleepwalking has been a problem before, like when she had to be rescued from nearly falling over a precipice by her eldest daughter Lianna. This time, however, even after an extended search there is barely any trace of left of Annalee to direct the investigation into her disappearance. As Annalee’s daughters Lianna and Paige and her husband Warren continue to search for answers, young detective Gavin Rikert is assigned to the case and begins to investigate. This sounds like a quick thriller that might be similar to another thriller I recently reviewed and liked called The Twilight Wife by A.J. Banner, in which the protagonist also had a medical condition that complicated the mystery of the book (she had amnesia). The Sleepwalker also has good reviews on Goodreads so it seems like a sure bet for thriller-lovers like me.


Human Acts Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionHuman Acts by Han Kang

Published: January 17th 2017

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Human Acts has been on my radar for a while now. I don’t often read fiction that is set in Asia, and I’m always looking to diversify my reading to include different settings and characters. This novel is set in South Korea, during a violent uprising by students and workers that actually occurred in 1980 to protest South Korea’s dictatorial regime. In the novel, among the dead from the uprising is a  young boy named Dong-ho, and the story follows his family and friends as they come to terms with their grief – from Dong-ho’s distraught mother, to his best friend, to a newspaper editor struggling with state censorship of the story. Han Kang has also written The Vegetarian, another novel that has been on my radar and that I’d like to read soon. I may schedule both to be reviewed together in the Spring.


This Is How It Always Is Book Cover On Novels And NonfictionThis Is How It Always Is by Laurie Frankel

Published: January 24th 2017

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This novel was Modern Mrs. Darcy’s pick for her book club for February, so I have a review of it planned for the end of that month. I’m hoping the LA public library decides to buy it because it’s currently not available in their system. It’s the story of a family whose five-year old son Claude – the youngest of five brothers – announces that she is transgender and actually wants to live as a girl when she grows up. Claude’s parents, Rosie and Penn, support Claude in her desire, but decide to keep her true nature a secret to the rest of the world, at least for the time being. Eventually, as all secrets, this one too reveals itself in a dramatic way. This novel received high praise from one of my favorite contemporary fiction authors – Liane Moriarty – who said “It made me laugh, it made me cry, it made me think” and 75% of its reviews on Goodreads are 4 Stars or more, so I’m really looking forward to reading it.


4321 Book Cover On Novels And Nonfiction4321 by Paul Aster

Published: January 31st 2017

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I had never heard of Paul Aster before reading about the release of 4321, though I now realize he’s a very prolific and pretty well-known author. I was very intrigued by the premise of his most recent novel and I guess if I end up liking it, I’ll have plenty more options for further reading. 4321 is the story of the life of Archibald Isaac Ferguson, born on March 3rd 1947 in New Jersey to Rose and Stanley Ferguson. From this starting point, Auster weaves four independent life paths for Archibald, in which four identical Archibalds end up leading four parallel but entirely different lives. One Archibald is rich, one is poor, one is athletic, one is a charmer with the ladies and so forth. Each one of these versions of Archibald ends up in love with the same woman, however, Amy Schneiderman, but each of the four relationships that ensue are very different one from the other. I don’t think I’ve read another book that sounds like this one – it is essentially four novels in one. Just for the originality of the premise, I’ll be picking this one up.

 


What January 2017 releases are you looking forward to most?

You can also check out my previous posts on December 2016 and November 2016 releases for more recent recommendations.

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  20 comments for “12 January 2017 Book Releases I’m Looking Forward To #BookReleases

  1. January 3, 2017 at 3:39 pm

    This is a wonderful list. I’m so glad I read it, if only because I thought Difficult Women was *non-fiction*! Oops. I’m glad I know going into reading it now.

    I also love the format of essays in non-fiction. Whether multiple authors or a single author, I really enjoy this easy to digest memoir format. It’s great to hear personal reflections in this way. I will need to look into I Call Myself a Feminist now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 3, 2017 at 9:47 pm

      I was equally confused about Difficult Women, I checked and rechecked to make sure I was right that it was fiction 🙂 lol

      Liked by 1 person

      • January 4, 2017 at 1:51 pm

        I just associate her with the two memoirs. Apparently she has another two short form fiction books! I am so behind the times. Oh well. Credit must be given where credit is due.

        Liked by 1 person

      • January 5, 2017 at 7:14 pm

        Hmm I hadn’t heard about her memoirs, I’ll have to look them up!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. January 3, 2017 at 8:44 pm

    If the new Hang Kan is anywhere near as good as The Vegetarian that would be my first pick. I loved The Vegetarian.

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 3, 2017 at 8:59 pm

      Thanks for the recommendation! I’ll definitely see if I can get them from the library within a reasonable timeframe!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. January 3, 2017 at 8:48 pm

    Definitely looking forward to the Paul Auster. Haven’t read any of his books either but this one sounds intriguing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 3, 2017 at 8:57 pm

      I know! It’s a highly original premise 🙂 the good thing is if we like it we’ll have plenty of new books to explore!

      Like

  4. sarahsbookshelvesblog
    January 4, 2017 at 12:59 am

    I’m curious about the Auster – I’d never heard of him before this either. But, I’m going to let others vet for me since it’s pretty long. Will read it if others like it.

    And I just finished The Sleepwalker…pretty good thriller.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Susie | Novel Visits
    January 4, 2017 at 4:49 am

    4321 sounds really interesting to me, too, but at 880 pages it’s huge commitment. I’m not sure I’m up to it. I’m reviewing History of Wolves on Thursday!

    Like

  6. Annie
    January 4, 2017 at 8:44 pm

    The sleepwalker sounds amazing, can’t wait to read what you think of it 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  7. January 5, 2017 at 5:04 am

    Physics has never been my thing either, so Storm in a Teacup also made my list! So did 4 3 2 1, which sounds fascinating. I’ll have a post up this Friday with all the others I’m excited about, but one I think you might also enjoy is The Winter in Anna 🙂

    Like

    • January 5, 2017 at 7:07 pm

      I’ll be looking out for your post on Friday 🙂 and I’m adding The Winter In Anna to my Goodreads. Thanks for the rec!

      Like

  8. January 7, 2017 at 2:15 am

    I always want to read all the fiction! But I’m also very tempted by Storm in a Cup (as well as Stuff Matters).

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 8, 2017 at 10:19 pm

      Stuff Matters was good but I wouldn’t necessarily say great. It’s almost like separate essays on different elements/materials. I think if you’re a science buff like me you’ll love it though 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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